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Merryn Somerset Webb

Biography

Merryn Somerset Webb started her career in Tokyo at public broadcaster NHK before becoming a Japanese equity broker at what was then Warburgs. She went on to work at SBC and then UBS without moving from her desk in Kamiyacho (it was the age of mergers).

 

After five years in Japan she returned to work in the UK at Paribas. This soon became BNP Paribas. Again no desk move was required. On leaving the City, Merryn helped The Week magazine with its City pages before becoming the launch editor of Moneyweek in 2000.

 

14 years on, Moneyweek is the best-selling financial magazine in the UK and Merryn remains as its editor-in-chief. Merryn also has a weekly column in the FT and a monthly column in Saga. She is a regular TV/radio commentator and speaker on financial matters and contributes to publications from the Spectator and Prospect to Woman & Home and Libertine (a magazine for the thoughtful woman).

 

She is a trustee of the Daiwa Anglo Japanese Foundation (which kindly financed her initial Japanese language education and sponsored her at NHK) and is a director of two investment trusts – the Baillie Gifford Shin Nippon Trust and the Montanaro European Smaller Companies Trust.

 

Merryn has a first class degree in history and economics from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge and was recently awarded an honorary doctorate in Business Administration from BBP University. She took and passed (with distinction) the Private Client Investment and Investment Management exam (which qualifies her to Level 6) in 2013.

Articles written by Merryn Somerset Webb

China’s official growth figures are made up. Don’t believe them for a minute

Officially, the Chinese economy is still growing at over 7%. But there is no way that is true, says Merryn Somerset Webb. Here’s why.

Pensioner bonds: the total cost to the taxpayer

Pensioner bonds are “ludicrously expensive” for the taxpayer, and make a mockery of the NS&I mission statement to reduce the cost of government borrowing.

Want a nice house in Scotland? The SNP wants it to cost you

The SNP’s new stamp duty equivalent for Scotland, appears to have been designed to send a clear message to the well off in Scotland – expect devolution to mean you pay more tax.

A warning to Scotland: ‘Tax competition’ matters

The Scottish government’s first use of a devolved tax was quickly revised, after being undercut by tax competition from the rest of the UK.

Time to rethink non-means-tested benefits for pensioners

Pensioner bonds are effectively another non-means-tested benefit for pensioners. It’s time we rethought the whole lot of them.

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